Owl is a master of disguise as his feathers blend perfectly with tree 

The incredible camouflage skills of an owl have been captured by an amateur photographer in . 

Tourist Chi Kit Leong, 31, captured the mesmerising photos while visiting the Thompson-Nicola region of British Columbia. 

In one of the images, the 30-inch tall Great Grey Owl is seen sitting on a branch with its face turned towards the tree. 

The photo, taken from behind the animal, shows how its feathers blend perfectly into the colour of the bark, making it almost invisible. 

Leong, a small business owner from Macau, China, took the images using his Nikon d500 camera. 

In another shot, the bird can be seen staring straight into the lens, with its orange beak and yellow eyes on full display.  

Tourist Chi Kit Leong, 31, captured the mesmerising photos while visiting the Thompson-Nicola region of British Columbia (Pictured: Great Grey Owl blends into the tree bark)

Tourist Chi Kit Leong, 31, captured the mesmerising photos while visiting the Thompson-Nicola region of British Columbia (Pictured: Great Grey Owl blends into the tree bark)

In another shot, the bird can be seen staring straight into the camera, with its orange beak and yellow eyes fully on display (pictured)

In another shot, the bird can be seen staring straight into the camera, with its orange beak and yellow eyes fully on display (pictured) 

The Great Grey Owl is the world’s largest species of owl by length and in some areas is often referred to as the Phantom of the North. 

It resides in the northern hemisphere and was first recognized by science in Canada in the late 18th century. 

It is just one of thousands of examples of animals blending into their habitats to hide from predators – or stalk prey. 

In November last year, a deadly crocodile was snapped perfectly camouflaged in a pit of mud in Australia.  

Pile of mud or disguise for one of Australia's deadliest creatures? Keep an eye out...

Pile of mud or disguise for one of Australia’s deadliest creatures?Keep an eye out…

Australian saltwater crocodiles are the largest living species of crocodile in the world, growing to around 4 or 5 metres in length, though specimens up to 6 metres are not unknown

Australian saltwater crocodiles are the largest living species of crocodile in the world, growing to around 4 or kampus terbaik di lampung 5 metres in length, though specimens up to 6 metres are not unknown

The photo of the saltwater croc hidden in heavy mud was shared to the Australian Native Animals group as a reminder to be careful in crocodile territory.

‘A reminder to be croc wise, steer clear of mud with eyes,’ wrote Rodney Fischer to accompany the picture of the barely distinguishable form of an Australian saltwater crocodile covered in mud. 

The only indication a croc is underneath the mud is one green-gold eye peering out, which many people commenting on the post thought was a leaf or a stone. 

‘Think I’ll grab that cool looking green pebble lying in all that mud…’ one person joked. 

‘I would have been lunch before I even saw it.Brilliant camouflage,’ commented another. 

‘She’s having a facial and wondering what all the fuss is about,’ a third shared.

Hidden somewhere in this picture is a spotted leopard camouflaged in the undergrowth - can you spot where it is?

Hidden somewhere in this picture is a spotted leopard camouflaged in the undergrowth – can you spot where it is?

A red ring shows where there elusive big cat was lurking in the Aravali Hills in Jaipur, western India

A red ring shows where there elusive big cat was lurking in the Aravali Hills in Jaipur, western India

A close-up of the spotted leopard captured in the undergrowth of the Aravali Hills in Jaipur, western India

A close-up of the spotted leopard captured in the undergrowth of the Aravali Hills in Jaipur, western India

‘Salties’ are the largest living species of crocodile in the world, growing to five metres in length, though specimens up to six metres are not unknown.  

In June, a leopard was found hidden in an image captured by amateur photographer Abhinav Garg while on a trip to the Aravali Hills outside Jaipur, in India. 

1 year ago

The 34-year-old did not realise he had snapped the wild cat until he got home, despite waiting for hours hoping to catch sight of the rare animal.